Dentist in Powder Springs, GA

We will make you Smile!

 Root Canal Powder Springs, GA

As experts, we know how important oral hygiene is for your health. We feel that it's important to go the extra mile to speak with our patients about the best practices involved with brushing, flossing, and healthy gums. We know what an impact a beautiful smile can make, which is why we are so dedicated to providing our patients with cleaner, straighter teeth than ever before.

Having served Georgia and East Cobb for years, we understand that no two patients will ever have the same needs. That's why we provide personalized services like cleanings and root canals tailored to each patient's unique needs. We also know that money doesn't grow on trees, so we accept most major dental insurance plans to ensure you can keep your teeth clean and healthy all year long.

If you're searching for an expert team of friendly dentists and hygienists, look no further than Merchants Walk Dental. We pride ourselves on the best dental care coupled with warm, engaging customer service. You can rest easy knowing you're in capable, welcoming hands whether it's your first or fortieth visit to our office.

Taking Care of Tooth Decay: Fillings in Powder Springs, GA

If you have had a cavity filled before, you're not alone. Tooth decay affects more than 90% of adults over the age of 40 - a stunning statistic that, in many cases, is entirely preventable. At Merchants Walk Dental, we use composite resin fillings to keep our patient's teeth healthy and functional. Unlike amalgam fillings, composite fillings are more discreet, match the color of your teeth, and are free of mercury.

While fillings can have a few uses, our doctors typically use fillings to “fill” a part of your tooth that is decaying. This hole of decay is called a cavity. Sometimes, fillings are also used to fix broken, cracked, or worn-down teeth from grinding and nail-biting. Fillings are a great way to restore decaying teeth to their normal shape and function while preventing sensitivity and inhibiting further decay.

During your dental exam at our office in East Cobb, your dental hygienist will check for signs of cavities and tooth decay to ensure your oral hygiene remains in peak condition.

The Merchants Walk Dental Difference

Having served the East Cobb and Powder Springs for years, we know your dental needs are unique and different from your neighbor. That's why we offer a variety of dental services to address each patient's special circumstances, from standard cleanings to complex root canals. By using the latest innovations and techniques in dentistry, we can better serve each client on an individualized level, leading to better comprehensive dental care.

We're taking new patients and accept most major forms of dental insurance to keep your teeth healthy and clean without breaking the bank. Contact our office today to schedule your dental exam and learn more about our history!

Physical-therapy-phone-number770-691-5051

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Latest News in Powder Springs, GA

Atlanta's own Coco Gauff poised to make history at US Open final, her coach reflects on her journey

POWDER SPRINGS, Ga. — Atlanta's very own Coco Gauff is poised to make history on Saturday, as she competes in the U.S. Open final, cementing her status as one of the youngest players to reach this milestone since Serena Williams in 1999.Gauff's former coach, Jewel Peterson, spoke about the 19-year-old's incredible journey and what it means for the next generation of tennis p...

POWDER SPRINGS, Ga. — Atlanta's very own Coco Gauff is poised to make history on Saturday, as she competes in the U.S. Open final, cementing her status as one of the youngest players to reach this milestone since Serena Williams in 1999.

Gauff's former coach, Jewel Peterson, spoke about the 19-year-old's incredible journey and what it means for the next generation of tennis players. Peterson's passion for tennis has deep roots and she considers it a family tradition.

"When I tell you I love coaching, I absolutely love it," Peterson said smiling. "When I'm having a really bad day, I get out on the court, and all of a sudden, I'm excited about life again."

Peterson's love for the sport began at a young age, thanks to her father's guidance.

"My dad taught me at a very early age. I started playing when I was four years old and loved it from the start," she recalled.

Today, she channels that passion into coaching the next generation of players and one former pupil holds a special place in her heart.

"When people ask me about coaching Coco, I tell them it was a coach's dream," Peterson said.

Gauff, an Atlanta native, is set to play in her first U.S. Open final this Saturday.

"I'm going to be watching. And I'm going to have a front row in front of my TV. Okay, I know. I am super excited to watch her play," Peterson exclaimed.

Gauff's journey at the U.S. Open has been remarkable and she is now one of four Black players to reach the quarterfinals at this prestigious tournament. This achievement highlights her exceptional talent and the growing diversity in tennis.

However, Gauff isn't the only Georgia tennis pro that Peterson knows and has coached. She mentioned another rising star, Chris Eubanks, who grew up in her father's academy.

"Chris grew up in my dad's academy, and my father was one of Chris' early coaches. To have been a part of that, it's extraordinary," Peterson said.

Reflecting on the changing landscape of tennis, Peterson emphasized that moments like these were once considered rare. However, she hopes that this trend continues for Gauff, Eubanks, and the young athletes who will follow in their footsteps.

"I think it's so, so, so impactful. I know now that so many players are being inspired by their success," she added.

Peterson expressed her confidence in Gauff's abilities and believes that she can clinch victory in the U.S. Open final as long as she maintains a resilient mindset and executes her strategy effectively.

As the world eagerly anticipates Gauff's historic appearance in the finals, her journey serves as a source of inspiration for tennis enthusiasts and aspiring athletes alike.

Atlanta's own Coco Gauff poised to make history at US Open final, her coach reflects on her journey

POWDER SPRINGS, Ga. — Atlanta's very own Coco Gauff is poised to make history on Saturday, as she competes in the U.S. Open final, cementing her status as one of the youngest players to reach this milestone since Serena Williams in 1999.Gauff's former coach, Jewel Peterson, spoke about the 19-year-old's incredible journey and what it means for the next generation of tennis p...

POWDER SPRINGS, Ga. — Atlanta's very own Coco Gauff is poised to make history on Saturday, as she competes in the U.S. Open final, cementing her status as one of the youngest players to reach this milestone since Serena Williams in 1999.

Gauff's former coach, Jewel Peterson, spoke about the 19-year-old's incredible journey and what it means for the next generation of tennis players. Peterson's passion for tennis has deep roots and she considers it a family tradition.

"When I tell you I love coaching, I absolutely love it," Peterson said smiling. "When I'm having a really bad day, I get out on the court, and all of a sudden, I'm excited about life again."

Peterson's love for the sport began at a young age, thanks to her father's guidance.

"My dad taught me at a very early age. I started playing when I was four years old and loved it from the start," she recalled.

Today, she channels that passion into coaching the next generation of players and one former pupil holds a special place in her heart.

"When people ask me about coaching Coco, I tell them it was a coach's dream," Peterson said.

Gauff, an Atlanta native, is set to play in her first U.S. Open final this Saturday.

"I'm going to be watching. And I'm going to have a front row in front of my TV. Okay, I know. I am super excited to watch her play," Peterson exclaimed.

Gauff's journey at the U.S. Open has been remarkable and she is now one of four Black players to reach the quarterfinals at this prestigious tournament. This achievement highlights her exceptional talent and the growing diversity in tennis.

However, Gauff isn't the only Georgia tennis pro that Peterson knows and has coached. She mentioned another rising star, Chris Eubanks, who grew up in her father's academy.

"Chris grew up in my dad's academy, and my father was one of Chris' early coaches. To have been a part of that, it's extraordinary," Peterson said.

Reflecting on the changing landscape of tennis, Peterson emphasized that moments like these were once considered rare. However, she hopes that this trend continues for Gauff, Eubanks, and the young athletes who will follow in their footsteps.

"I think it's so, so, so impactful. I know now that so many players are being inspired by their success," she added.

Peterson expressed her confidence in Gauff's abilities and believes that she can clinch victory in the U.S. Open final as long as she maintains a resilient mindset and executes her strategy effectively.

As the world eagerly anticipates Gauff's historic appearance in the finals, her journey serves as a source of inspiration for tennis enthusiasts and aspiring athletes alike.

Cobb County fifth grader publishes book on processing mental health

Ta'Kari Tatum is a Varner Elementary School student with a remarkable message.POWDER SPRINGS, Ga. — Impact isn’t about age. Ta'Kari Tatum is proof.He’s a fifth grader at Varner Elementary School in Cobb County. At 11 years old, he’s also a newly published author.“His class is so incredibly proud,” said teacher Laurie Mendenhall.Ta'Kari's latest project will soon be part of the school librar...

Ta'Kari Tatum is a Varner Elementary School student with a remarkable message.

POWDER SPRINGS, Ga. — Impact isn’t about age. Ta'Kari Tatum is proof.

He’s a fifth grader at Varner Elementary School in Cobb County. At 11 years old, he’s also a newly published author.

“His class is so incredibly proud,” said teacher Laurie Mendenhall.

Ta'Kari's latest project will soon be part of the school library.

His "snap it" bracelets are already part of the school culture. They are rubber band bracelets people wear. When they feel stress or anxiety, they take a deep breath and snap the rubber band bracelet. It’s a reminder to slow down and talk about what they are feeling. Ta'Kari has shared more than 20,000 snap it bracelets to people all over the country.

He also had a dream to share a deeper message about mental health and be part of the solution. It’s why he wrote a children’s book called “Snap It.”

“Seeing it all come together was a breathtaking and surreal experience," Ta'Kari said.

If you would like to order Ta'Kari's book, visit this link

He says a difficult few years served as the inspiration for the project.

“It was really just thinking about all the things that happened in my life and my mental health journey and putting those things on paper," he said.

Ta'Kari's best friend, his grandfather, died in the pandemic. Ta'Kari saw so many of his friends struggling too.

“My book is an extension of telling people that mental health matters and it is a serious thing that almost everyone goes through," he said.

His grandmother, Gwen Tatum, has supported his dream.

“I’m in awe," she said. "I can’t even put it in words how proud I am of him.”

She says Ta'Kari wrote this book in one week over his Fall Break.

“It was like God was giving him the words and he was just writing them down," she said.

“He is my inspiration, he fills my heart," his teacher Mrs. Mendenhall said. “It’s been incredible to see how he’s taken the hardest time in his life and made something good and impactful out of it.”

In the book, Ta'Kari writes about a time someone called him a “baby” when he was sad and struggling with his grandpa’s death. Ta'Kari lashed out at the time.

He wasn’t sure what to do with the emotions building inside. Mrs. Mendenhall reached out to his grandma hoping they could find a way to support Ta'Kari. That started an important conversation and his snap it bracelet project. It’s helped Ta'Kari work through his grief and helped many others deal with theirs.

Now-retired Varner Elementary School art teacher Robin Glover illustrated his book.

“Being asked to be part of the journey was such an amazing opportunity," she said.

Principal Althea Singletary sees the reach of Ta'Kari's impact.

“For students to see you have a great idea and you see it through and so many wonderful things can happen," she said.

Ta'Kari has a hope for everyone who reads his book: “I hope kids feel they are not alone and it’s okay not to be okay.”

"I want them to know they may not feel okay now, but it will be okay someday," he added.

Ta'Kari knows talking about it is the most important first step.

A message that’s made a difference for his dad, too.

“As men, so often we’re told to just get over things," Ta'Kari's father said. “Everyone is going through something and we need to be able to talk openly about it.”

He says Ta'Kari's project has helped him profoundly, too.

“He doesn’t know how big of an impact it’s made me and the family." he said.

An impact that will continue to grow.

Georgia craft brewers demand change in state law to sell own beer

POWDER SPRINGS, Ga. - The Georgia craft brewing industry is calling for change. They want the state to relax restrictions on how they can sell beer and have launched a petition to get the attention of state lawmakers.Doug Farrell co-owns the Skint Chestnut Brewing Company in Powder Springs. The brewery is less than two years old. Farrell says he is proud of what they have built, but they would love to do more."We are limited by several of the state laws that make it very challenging for us to do anything b...

POWDER SPRINGS, Ga. - The Georgia craft brewing industry is calling for change. They want the state to relax restrictions on how they can sell beer and have launched a petition to get the attention of state lawmakers.

Doug Farrell co-owns the Skint Chestnut Brewing Company in Powder Springs. The brewery is less than two years old. Farrell says he is proud of what they have built, but they would love to do more.

"We are limited by several of the state laws that make it very challenging for us to do anything beyond what we're doing right now," he said.

Farrell says Georgia law only allows them to sell their beer at their taproom. If they want to sell it somewhere else, they have to get a distributor and Farrell says that cuts into the bottom-line.

"My goal is not to be one of these giant breweries, my goal is to be able to get beer out into my local community so that they can walk into a store or a restaurant they see my beer on the shelf, or they see it on the tap," he said.

Georgia Senate Bill 163 was introduced earlier this year. If passed, it would allow breweries like Skint Chestnut to sell their beer to restaurants and grocery stores within 100 miles. The bill failed to gain traction during the last session, but the Georgia Craft Brewers Guild just started a new petition to get support for it next year.

"We're looking for a more fair and open access to the market for there to be more flexibility for these businesses," said Joseph Cortes, Executive Director of the Georgia Craft Brewers Guild.

On the other side, not everyone thinks the state law should be changed. The owner of a local distribution company told FOX 5 that he believes it would be problematic if breweries could sell their own beer. He says retailers have told him that would cause issues if they had to deal with each brewery individually.

But Farrell believes the current law is harming small businesses, and he hopes it gets changed to not only help him, but also the more than 150 other craft breweries in the state.

"We're hoping for some changes at the state level that will allow us to do this and be a little bit more competitive," he said.

Since the petition went live, the Georgia Craft Brewers Guild says more than a thousand people have already signed it.

If you want to take a look at the petition, click here.

Calvary Children's Home Christmas tree lot in Cobb benefiting children in need

POWDER SPRINGS, Ga. - While many spent Black Friday searching for deals, for others it's the day to start searching for their Christmas tree.Picking out that perfect tree can be difficult."When you have four really opinionated kids, it's really tough!" said Jay Taylor, who was out with his family looking for a tree.But for Jay Taylor and his family, choosing to buy their tree from the Calvary Children's Home tree lot was an easy decision.RELATED: ...

POWDER SPRINGS, Ga. - While many spent Black Friday searching for deals, for others it's the day to start searching for their Christmas tree.

Picking out that perfect tree can be difficult.

"When you have four really opinionated kids, it's really tough!" said Jay Taylor, who was out with his family looking for a tree.

But for Jay Taylor and his family, choosing to buy their tree from the Calvary Children's Home tree lot was an easy decision.

RELATED: Christmas tree prices up 10% since last year, American Christmas Tree Association says

"We live in the community, and we know what Calvary does for kids," said Taylor.

The Calvary Children's Home in Powder Springs is for kids who, for one reason or another, can no longer live with their parents.

"When families struggle sometimes and run into some difficult situations, it provides a place where brothers and sisters don't have to be separated. We provide counseling, tutoring, local and Christian school and all the activities in between," said Allen Young of Calvary Children's Home.

Calvary Children's Home has been selling trees for 18 years. Last year they sold close to 1,000 trees. It's one of the biggest fundraisers.

Volunteers from the community chip in, and the children who live on campus put in full days' work on the tree lot.

"They're bonding with the community, and they know the proceeds eventually go back to them, so they like to have a part in it," said Young.

There are a lot of repeat customers who come to support the children's home.

"I always come over here to get my tree, and it's always the day after thanksgiving," said Troy Harmon.

RELATED: Picking out the perfect Christmas tree

In addition to the support, families can typically find that perfect tree that everyone can agree on.

"We've settled on this one, so yes, it's fat and tall, so it does fit all the requirements," said Taylor.

The address for the Calvary Children's Home is 1430 Lost Mountain Road in Powder Springs. The tree lot is open from 3:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday, 9a.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturdays, and 12:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. on Sundays.

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