Dentist in Milton, GA

We will make you Smile!

 Root Canal Milton, GA

As experts, we know how important oral hygiene is for your health. We feel that it's important to go the extra mile to speak with our patients about the best practices involved with brushing, flossing, and healthy gums. We know what an impact a beautiful smile can make, which is why we are so dedicated to providing our patients with cleaner, straighter teeth than ever before.

Having served Georgia and East Cobb for years, we understand that no two patients will ever have the same needs. That's why we provide personalized services like cleanings and root canals tailored to each patient's unique needs. We also know that money doesn't grow on trees, so we accept most major dental insurance plans to ensure you can keep your teeth clean and healthy all year long.

If you're searching for an expert team of friendly dentists and hygienists, look no further than Merchants Walk Dental. We pride ourselves on the best dental care coupled with warm, engaging customer service. You can rest easy knowing you're in capable, welcoming hands whether it's your first or fortieth visit to our office.

Taking Care of Tooth Decay: Fillings in Milton, GA

If you have had a cavity filled before, you're not alone. Tooth decay affects more than 90% of adults over the age of 40 - a stunning statistic that, in many cases, is entirely preventable. At Merchants Walk Dental, we use composite resin fillings to keep our patient's teeth healthy and functional. Unlike amalgam fillings, composite fillings are more discreet, match the color of your teeth, and are free of mercury.

While fillings can have a few uses, our doctors typically use fillings to “fill” a part of your tooth that is decaying. This hole of decay is called a cavity. Sometimes, fillings are also used to fix broken, cracked, or worn-down teeth from grinding and nail-biting. Fillings are a great way to restore decaying teeth to their normal shape and function while preventing sensitivity and inhibiting further decay.

During your dental exam at our office in East Cobb, your dental hygienist will check for signs of cavities and tooth decay to ensure your oral hygiene remains in peak condition.

The Merchants Walk Dental Difference

Having served the East Cobb and Milton for years, we know your dental needs are unique and different from your neighbor. That's why we offer a variety of dental services to address each patient's special circumstances, from standard cleanings to complex root canals. By using the latest innovations and techniques in dentistry, we can better serve each client on an individualized level, leading to better comprehensive dental care.

We're taking new patients and accept most major forms of dental insurance to keep your teeth healthy and clean without breaking the bank. Contact our office today to schedule your dental exam and learn more about our history!

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Latest News in Milton, GA

Milton runs for 156 yards and 2 TDs, No. 1 Georgia holds off Georgia Tech 31-23

ATLANTA (AP) — Kendall Milton wasn’t surprised by Georgia’s ability to overcome a depleted offense to continue its dominance of rival Georgia Tech.Milton ran for a career-high 156 yards and two touchdowns and No. 1 Georgia held off the Yellow Jackets 31-23 on Saturday night to cap its third consecutive undefeated regular season with its sixth straight victory in the state ...

ATLANTA (AP) — Kendall Milton wasn’t surprised by Georgia’s ability to overcome a depleted offense to continue its dominance of rival Georgia Tech.

Milton ran for a career-high 156 yards and two touchdowns and No. 1 Georgia held off the Yellow Jackets 31-23 on Saturday night to cap its third consecutive undefeated regular season with its sixth straight victory in the state rivalry.

Georgia was missing three of its top five receivers and a starting offensive lineman. Tight end Brock Bowers (ankle) and wide receivers Ladd McConkey (ankle) and Rara Thomas (foot sprain) did not play. Right guard Tate Ratledge (knee) also was held out.

“That’s what this team is built on,” Milton said. “I felt we never had a week with everyone on the field.”

Milton set a season high for a Georgia running back.

“Kendall stepped up all year,” Georgia coach Kirby Smart said. “He did a great job with yards after contact.”

Georgia (12-0, No. 1 College Football Playoff) extended its school-record winning streak to 29 games. The Bulldogs have won 19 of the last 22 against Georgia Tech (6-6), but this was more competitive than most recent battles for the Governor’s Cup Trophy.

“This game is not measured by stats and rushing yards and first downs,” Smart said. “It is measured by heart and our guys have to have a lot of heart to show up like they have, week after week after week.”

Georgia protected its hopes of becoming the first team to win three straight national championships in The Associated Press poll era.

The Bulldogs will play No. 8 Alabama next week in the Southeastern Conference Championship game in Atlanta. Georgia players maintained their focus on taking care of bragging rights in the state before shifting their attention to Alabama.

Even Smart said he didn’t know details of Alabama’s last-minute 27-24 win over Auburn on Saturday.

“They made sure we knew how personal it was,” Milton said of Georgia coaches. “They really put it in perspective of how important it is. This game was a game to make history, to finish it out the right way.”

Quarterback Haynes King had two touchdown runs and Jamal Haynes also ran for a score. Eric Singleton Jr. had four catches for 96 yards as the Yellow Jackets gained 363 yards, including 205 on the ground.

“There are no moral victories,” said Georgia Tech coach Brent Key. “We came up short today.”

King’s 5-yard scoring run with 3:46 remaining cut Georgia’s lead to 31-23. Georgia recovered an onside kick and relied on its running game, led by Milton and Daijun Edwards, to run out the clock.

Georgia Tech led 7-0 in the first quarter and 10-7 in the second before the Bulldogs answered with 24 consecutive points to lead 31-13 late in the third.

The Bulldogs committed a turnover on their first snap. Edwards fumbled when hit by linebacker Kyle Efford. Kenan Johnson recovered for the Yellow Jackets at the Georgia 37. Following King’s 28-yard pass to Brett Seither, King’s 9-yard scoring run gave Georgia Tech a 7-0 lead.

Carson Beck’s 29-yard touchdown pass to Dominic Lovett tied it. Milton and Edwards had 3-yard scoring runs to give Georgia a 21-13 halftime lead.

KEY TO IMPROVEMENT

The Bulldogs outscored the Yellow Jackets 134-21 the last three years, including a 45-0 rout in 2021 and a 37-14 win last season. This game was more competitive in the Yellow Jackets’ first full season with Key.

“Credit to Georgia Tech,” Smart said.

“You see across the country in these rivalry games what happens. I know better than anybody that it can go either way in these type games. Very emotional. Very different.”

TOO MANY FIELD GOALS

Georgia Tech had to settle for three field goals by Aidan Birr.

“Anytime you don’t convert touchdowns when you get in the red area, those windows get tighter,” Key said.

THE TAKEAWAY

Georgia: The Bulldogs compiled 437 yards despite missing some of their top receivers and committing two turnovers, including fourth-quarter interception thrown by Carson Beck from the Georgia Tech 6. The ball, intended for Marcus Rosemy-Jacksaint, was picked off by K.J. Wallace.

Georgia Tech: Offensive coordinator Buster Faulkner, the former Georgia’s offensive quality control assistant for quarterbacks, had an impressive plan. The Yellow Jackets were effective in mixing runs by King, Dontae Smith and Jamal Haynes with passes to speedy wide receiver Eric Singleton. Haynes ran for 81 yards. Singleton had four catches for 96 yards.

POLL IMPLICATIONS

Georgia’s lead in The AP Top 25 poll could shrink as it tries to extend its streak of 23 consecutive weeks atop the poll, the longest streak in SEC history. The Bulldogs also will be looking to retain their No. 1 spot in the CFP.

UP NEXT

Georgia: Faces No. 8 Alabama in the SEC championship game next Saturday in Atlanta.

Georgia Tech: Awaits its first bowl invitation since 2018.

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AP college football: https://apnews.com/hub/ap-top-25-college-football-poll and https://apnews.com/hub/college-football

Milton held secret election meeting, mayor apologizes

MILTON, Ga. — After residents took issue with an unadvertised Sept. 18 meeting that featured a quorum of Milton City Council members discussing the municipal election, Mayor Peyton Jamison issued a statement to clear the record.Former Councilwoman Laura Bentley said the council broke off into a separate gathering immediately after an advertised meeting held at 11 a.m. at the North Fulton CID office in Avalon. The 11 a.m. public meeting was to discuss the Windward Parkway/Ga. 9 master plan.Bentley said she found out about ...

MILTON, Ga. — After residents took issue with an unadvertised Sept. 18 meeting that featured a quorum of Milton City Council members discussing the municipal election, Mayor Peyton Jamison issued a statement to clear the record.

Former Councilwoman Laura Bentley said the council broke off into a separate gathering immediately after an advertised meeting held at 11 a.m. at the North Fulton CID office in Avalon. The 11 a.m. public meeting was to discuss the Windward Parkway/Ga. 9 master plan.

Bentley said she found out about the second meeting because she had spoken with councilmembers.

“Based on people’s account of what took place, I would have been there. You would have been there. I’m sure 100 people would have been there,” Bentley said.

Milton resident Mary Cronk joined Bentley in asking for details about the unadvertised gathering at the Oct. 16 City Council meeting. Both referenced the city charter and the Georgia Open Meetings Act, which states that oral or written notice of such a meeting must be given to the public 24 hours in advance.

“The Open Meetings Law is the foundation of government transparency,” Bentley said at the podium. “You are our representatives.”

News

Cronk quoted a section that describes “special circumstances,” in which a notice may be given in less than 24 hours so long as it’s given to the city’s legal organ. The Milton Herald was not notified about the Sept. 18 meeting.

In a prepared statement, Jamison said the meeting involved an election update from the city manager which included an “admonishment that repeated calls for investigations by councilmembers may work an overall negative in the public’s eye and may result in inquiries by other agencies.”

Contacted by phone, Jamison elaborated to say City Manager Steve Krokoff was worried any noise about investigations could distract the city from running a successful election.

“We're going to publish these minutes and use this as a learning experience,” he said.

Four days after the unannounced Sept. 18 meeting, Appen Media published an article about a potential second city probe related to Councilman Rick Mohrig’s election activities. The idea had been sparked by requests from at least two councilmembers.

“The city manager asked that the council be patient and allow him and his staff to complete the election process as he was tasked to do,” Jamison said at the City Council meeting. “It was improper for us to have that discussion in that environment, and this oversight falls on me.”

Jamison said no votes were taken at the Sept. 18 meeting and that he has consulted the city attorney about additional training on open meetings “to ensure no future lapses of any kind occur.”

“I want to emphasize that the maintaining of transparency and fostering public confidence in our government are paramount to both myself as well as the rest of council,” Jamison said.

Edwards and Milton Prepare for Vanderbilt

ATHENS — University of Georgia seniors Daijun Edwards and Kendall Milton spoke with the media Wednesday evening after practice and offered the following comments regarding the team's upcoming game against Vanderbilt.#2 ...

ATHENS — University of Georgia seniors Daijun Edwards and Kendall Milton spoke with the media Wednesday evening after practice and offered the following comments regarding the team's upcoming game against Vanderbilt.

#2 Kendall Milton | Sr. | RB On how it feels to have both him and Daijun back healthy… "I feel great about it, me and Daijun back. We both came in as freshman together and we were those young guys on the third team working together, and just to be out this point now where we're both healthy and at a point to where we can both be on the field together is exciting, cause we're out there every day together. We let each other know "Oh you should've hit that gap, or you should've done this or that", so we just try to push each other to be great, so to be able to go out there and have success with somebody that makes me better every day, I'm excited."

On his relationship with Daijun and what it's like to watch him on the field… "Daijun deserves everything that has come to him, nothing was really given to him, but he just continues to work. Even when we both came in, he just worked so hard, as you guys know he's a pretty quiet guy so he's not going to be super vocal, he's just a workhorse and he just continues to come in and put that effort in every day. To be able to see him have success doing the things he works for makes me happy and it makes me want to just keep working with him."

On what he thinks the running back room is capable of over the next six games… "I feel like the sky is the limit with all the different backs we have. With everybody it's a lot of different types of backs, I feel like it'll be able to open up the offense and allow us to put different schemes in with different plays. I'm just excited for the running back room because we push each other every single day to make each other better. Getting through that barrier after a play we'll come back to the huddle asking each other 'did you see anything,' just trying to get that feedback to try to make each other better. I just want to see everybody succeed."

#30 Daijun Edwards | Sr. | RB On how getting game experience early in his career helped him develop… "It was really big. In-game action is kind of different from practice, so in-game action has made a big difference."

On the potential of him and Kendall together as a duo… "I feel like we have real good potential, we just need to keep working."

On what has impressed him most about Dillon Bell playing running back… "He's explosive and shifty. He can make moves, can catch the ball and can run routes very well."

Milton City Council responds to elections scrutiny, legal challenges

MILTON, Ga. — Since Milton began preparing for its first self-conducted municipal election, officials have been relatively silent on the scrutiny they have faced regarding their administration. That changed Wednesday night with an official statement drafted by Milton’s city attorney office.City Councilman Paul Moore read the statement into record at a Milton City Council meeting Sept. 6. Before doing so, Moore described a number of “attacks” on the city by an “angry” blogger, the press and others....

MILTON, Ga. — Since Milton began preparing for its first self-conducted municipal election, officials have been relatively silent on the scrutiny they have faced regarding their administration. That changed Wednesday night with an official statement drafted by Milton’s city attorney office.

City Councilman Paul Moore read the statement into record at a Milton City Council meeting Sept. 6. Before doing so, Moore described a number of “attacks” on the city by an “angry” blogger, the press and others.

“It's been unfortunate that we don't have an opportunity very often to correct the record, and we've been pretty quiet as a city in doing so,” Moore said. “What came to my attention recently is that there was another attack on the city by an attorney.”

The city’s statement was a response to allegations raised in a complaint filed to the State Elections Board by Bryan Sells, an Atlanta lawyer who specializes in voting rights, election law and redistricting.

“There is no merit to the suggestion that Milton’s process has been compromised, or anything other than front-facing, transparent, thoroughly vetted and legally compliant,” Moore read from the letter, then read again for emphasis.

Sells’ complaint is not the first notice filed to the state questioning Milton’s municipal election process. Another was a letter sent by Milton Families First, an independent expenditure committee which raises money to influence elections.

Citizens form independent committee ahead of Milton City Council election

Sells levies state election code for his argument, alleging Milton didn’t have the authority to change the number and boundary of voting precincts. In an interview with Appen Media last month, Sells offered his own interpretation of Georgia law.

“Polling places in Fulton County can only be changed by the Fulton County Commission,” Sells said.

At the Wednesday meeting, Milton officially approved three polling locations for Election Day, one in each council district, for its Nov. 7 election. Votes can be cast at City Hall, the Community Center at Milton Park and Preserve and the Milton Public Safety Complex. Before this year, Fulton County provided eight polling locations.

In an August interview Appen Media questioned Milton City Attorney Ken Jarrard about Sells’ interpretation.

Jarrard cited a state code section that delineates powers to the “superintendent of county or the governing authority of the municipality” — interpreting it to mean the City Council was legally allowed to cast decisions on its election administration.

The letter read by Moore Sept. 6 reiterated and expanded upon that reading of the law.

In his complaint to the State Elections Board, Sells also took issue with the “improper influence” into the hiring of the city’s election consultant as well as incumbents participating in the administration of their own election.

But the city says this implicit suggestion, that incumbents must recuse, is untenable.

“If it were the case that council members whose posts were on the ballot were disqualified from voting on precincts, or other logistical issues, then during the 2025 city election cycle, a quorum of council would be automatically disqualified,” Moore read.

Matthew Weiss, who serves as the deputy general counsel for the Democratic Party of Georgia, brought forth concerns similar to Sells’ during the public comment portion of the meeting.

Weiss also said having one early voting location, which is at City Hall, is “less than ideal.”

He went on to say this municipal election will have “outsized importance,” because other cities in Fulton County are looking at how Milton is administering its election for their own 2025 and 2027 municipal election cycles.

“I think it’s important to us and to the voters of Milton that everything is done in compliance with state election code, regulations,” Weiss said.

Milton elections cost now $60,000 higher than Fulton County

MILTON, Ga. — Prompted by cost savings when it opted to run its own municipal election this year, the City of Milton will have spent more than it would have paid Fulton County to run the show.An Appen Media study conducted through open records and interviews shows the city will have spent at least $60,000 more.Soon after the City Council adopted Milton’s fiscal year 2024 budget in September allocating $102,280 for the municipal election, a dozen more poll workers were hired.City staff discovered during a tria...

MILTON, Ga. — Prompted by cost savings when it opted to run its own municipal election this year, the City of Milton will have spent more than it would have paid Fulton County to run the show.

An Appen Media study conducted through open records and interviews shows the city will have spent at least $60,000 more.

Soon after the City Council adopted Milton’s fiscal year 2024 budget in September allocating $102,280 for the municipal election, a dozen more poll workers were hired.

City staff discovered during a trial run that they needed more tabulators to count the ballots at the end of Election Day. Paid at $17 an hour in addition to $40 for training, the 12 new hires increased the election budget by $1,500. Five hours of work was estimated for each.

Milton now has a total of 55 poll workers. That’s not including Deputy City Manager Stacey Inglis, who will double as the chief manager of tabulation, and Lavinia White, the city’s new election consultant.

Some poll workers have also served on one of three volunteer committees, pulled together to cut the workload of election preparation. Two committees, one for training and one for tabulation, are no longer active.

The Training Committee was responsible for assembling the poll worker training manual. The Tabulation Committee helped determine the best way to count votes and helped finalize the tabulation training manual.

Members of the Communications Committee, headed by Milton Communications Director Greg Botelho, have been making recommendations on how to best inform the public on various aspects of the election through website content, social media posts and printed material. They will continue to meet until the conclusion of the municipal election.

Another factor to consider in the city’s election budget, which has not been previously calculated, is city staff time dedicated to elections. While the city’s volunteers may have helped, Appen Media estimates tens of thousands of election dollars have been spent in time against a six-figure salary for city employees involved in the process.

In a May interview, City Manager Steve Krokoff said he spent around 30 percent of his time on the city election, which amounts to more than $5,800 in a month based on his current $232,061 salary. Today, half of his work time is spent on election matters.

Krokoff is not alone apportioning time away from regular duties.

Back in May, Inglis was already dedicating half of her work schedule to elections. For Inglis, whose current annual salary is $176,562, that figure jumped up to 100 percent in August — or $14,714 a month. She and City Clerk Tammy Lowit share the responsibility of deputy elections superintendent and deputy ballot clerk.

Lowit, who also serves as the city’s absentee ballot clerk, has a current annual salary of $97,294. She has also dedicated more of her time, around half of it, to election-related work in recent months, and that time will likely increase once advanced voting begins Oct. 16.

Lowit must also deal with an onslaught of open records requests; Krokoff has had his fair share of media inquiries as well.

Appen Media calculates the city has spent a total of $146,694 in city staff time since January, based on time estimates provided by Krokoff from January to September.

Krokoff also told Appen Media the legal fees Milton has incurred due to the municipal election have more than exhausted the budget’s 10 percent contingency. He was correct.

From September 2021 to August 2023, Milton City Attorney Ken Jarrard said the city has spent $27,700 in legal fees related to the November general municipal election — $17,472 more than the 10 percent buffer.

Legal fees are the result of drafting election-related resolutions as part of standard council procedure, or interpreting state election code for city staff. But the city is also billed when Jarrard’s office responds to election inquiries from the media or private citizens.

Fulton County officials said they would have charged Milton $216,565 for its municipal election this year. With the extra poll workers, the consideration of city staff efforts, and all the legal fees, the city is looking at an election budget of about $280,000. That figure does not include projected staff time or legal expenses for October and November.

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