Dentist in Kennesaw, GA

We will make you Smile!

 Root Canal Kennesaw, GA

As experts, we know how important oral hygiene is for your health. We feel that it's important to go the extra mile to speak with our patients about the best practices involved with brushing, flossing, and healthy gums. We know what an impact a beautiful smile can make, which is why we are so dedicated to providing our patients with cleaner, straighter teeth than ever before.

Having served Georgia and East Cobb for years, we understand that no two patients will ever have the same needs. That's why we provide personalized services like cleanings and root canals tailored to each patient's unique needs. We also know that money doesn't grow on trees, so we accept most major dental insurance plans to ensure you can keep your teeth clean and healthy all year long.

If you're searching for an expert team of friendly dentists and hygienists, look no further than Merchants Walk Dental. We pride ourselves on the best dental care coupled with warm, engaging customer service. You can rest easy knowing you're in capable, welcoming hands whether it's your first or fortieth visit to our office.

Taking Care of Tooth Decay: Fillings in Kennesaw, GA

If you have had a cavity filled before, you're not alone. Tooth decay affects more than 90% of adults over the age of 40 - a stunning statistic that, in many cases, is entirely preventable. At Merchants Walk Dental, we use composite resin fillings to keep our patient's teeth healthy and functional. Unlike amalgam fillings, composite fillings are more discreet, match the color of your teeth, and are free of mercury.

While fillings can have a few uses, our doctors typically use fillings to “fill” a part of your tooth that is decaying. This hole of decay is called a cavity. Sometimes, fillings are also used to fix broken, cracked, or worn-down teeth from grinding and nail-biting. Fillings are a great way to restore decaying teeth to their normal shape and function while preventing sensitivity and inhibiting further decay.

During your dental exam at our office in East Cobb, your dental hygienist will check for signs of cavities and tooth decay to ensure your oral hygiene remains in peak condition.

The Merchants Walk Dental Difference

Having served the East Cobb and Kennesaw for years, we know your dental needs are unique and different from your neighbor. That's why we offer a variety of dental services to address each patient's special circumstances, from standard cleanings to complex root canals. By using the latest innovations and techniques in dentistry, we can better serve each client on an individualized level, leading to better comprehensive dental care.

We're taking new patients and accept most major forms of dental insurance to keep your teeth healthy and clean without breaking the bank. Contact our office today to schedule your dental exam and learn more about our history!

Physical-therapy-phone-number770-691-5051

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Latest News in Kennesaw, GA

Softball Treks to Georgia for Kennesaw State Tournament

KENNESAW, Ga. – After a 4-1 opening weekend at the Paradise Classic in Honolulu, Hawaii, Ole Miss softball treks to the other side of the country for the Kennesaw State Tournament February 16-18.LEADING OFF • The Rebels bounced back after falling to BYU in their season opener, picking up four straight wins to close out the first weekend of competition. • Junior Lexie Brady ra...

KENNESAW, Ga. – After a 4-1 opening weekend at the Paradise Classic in Honolulu, Hawaii, Ole Miss softball treks to the other side of the country for the Kennesaw State Tournament February 16-18.

LEADING OFF • The Rebels bounced back after falling to BYU in their season opener, picking up four straight wins to close out the first weekend of competition. • Junior Lexie Brady racked up the fourth most RBI in the nation on opening weekend, finishing with 11 in her first five games of the season. • Despite only having 10 at-bats this season, Jamie Mackay has been one of the hottest hitters at the plate for Ole Miss. The sophomore boasts a .700 average, the 15th best mark in the nation. • Batting at the top of the order in all five games this season, Jalia Lassiter has proven to be one of the top leadoff hitters in the nation. She was one of only 18 players in the country to post at least 10 hits on opening weekend. • Ole Miss' coaching staff features three new faces. Daniel Nicolaisen, Karl Gollan and DJ Sanders all join the Rebels for their first season in Oxford. • Ole Miss returns 13 players from last season's roster, including fifth-year seniors Paige Smith and Makenna Kliethermes. The 2024 roster also includes four impact transfers in Brianna Lopez, Jaden Pone, Delaney Rummell and Ryan Starr.

SCOUTING THE FIELD Jenny Allard takes over the Pitt softball program after 28 years as the head coach of Harvard, where she was the winningest head coach in Ivy League history. On opening weekend, Pitt went 2-2 at the LSU Invitational, dropping both contests against the Tigers. After starting in all but three games last season, Kat Rodriguez returned to the Panthers lineup for her senior season. She recorded two hits and knocked in one run during the weekend. In the all-time series, Ole Miss leads 4-0, including two wins in the most recent two matchups in 2019.

Entering his sixth season at Kennesaw State, Tripp Mackay holds a 117-120 record as head coach, with the Owls' first-ever tournament appearance in 2021 on his resume. After an injury riddled 2023, the KSU started their 2024 season with a 2-2 record at the Texas State tournament. After an impressive freshman season, Kenley Hilleary returns to the circle for the Owls, getting credit for both wins on the opening weekend of the season, including one complete game. This will be the third and fourth matchup between the two programs. The all-time series is split 1-1, with the most recent meeting being in 2008, where Kennesaw State evened the series.

Cheryl Milligan enters her second season as head coach of the ETSU Buccaneers, taking over the program in December of 2022 after four years at Army. In year one, East Tennessee State finished with a record of 17-37. The Bucs bring back Cameron Young, who started off her junior year batting .500 on the opening weekend at the Runnin' Bulldog Classic. She knocked in two runs while also completing all of her fielding attempts at third base. This will be the first matchup between the Rebels and the Buccaneers.

BRADY BUNCH After patiently waiting for her opportunity, Lexie Brady took over as the Rebels' starting catcher for 19 of the final 20 games last season, powering Ole Miss down the stretch. This past weekend in Hawaii, she opened her junior season with a bang, mashing three home runs, including her first career multi-home run game. Brady, a Sioux Falls, South Dakota, native, was responsible for 14 of the Rebels' 36 runs on the weekend, finishing with 11 RBI, tied for the fourth most in the nation.

HOT HITTING Scoring 36 runs and racking up 53 hits over the first five games of the season, Ole Miss' offense was firing on all cylinders. The team's .379 mark at the plate ranks as the 14th best batting average in the nation after one weekend of play. Not only are the Rebels seeing the ball fly off the bat, but they are showing patience at the plate, drawing 21 walks (30th nationally) to boast the seventh best on-base percentage in all of Division I softball at .485. Sophomore Jamie Mackay leads Ole Miss at the plate with a .700 batting average, including a career-best 4-for-4 performance against Kansas City. Three other Rebels, Jalia Lassiter, Delaney Rummell and Jaden Pone, all boast batting averages over the .400 mark.

SPINNING IT With four returning arms in the circle and two newcomers, the Rebels have no shortage of pitching talent. The staff posted a 1.53 ERA at the Paradise Classic, where they picked up four wins. Makenna Kliethermes led the way, picking up wins in both of her starts, allowing only two earned runs over 11.2 innings pitched. Grace Sparks also saw 11.0 innings of work, pitching in three games for the Rebels and earning the victory against Kansas City. Catelyn Riley tossed the lone shutout on the weekend, only allowing three hits in a five-inning rout of Hawaii. Lefty Brianna Lopez also got in on the action, seeing 2.1 innings out of the bullpen. She held opposing batters to a team-low .125 mark at the plate.

ON ISLAND TIME Traveling over 4,000 miles to Honolulu, Hawaii, the Rebels opened the 2024 season at the Paradise Classic. Despite dropping the opener to BYU, Ole Miss finished with a 4-1 record, picking up wins over Nevada, Kansas City and a pair over Hawaii.

REBEL DEBUTS So far this season, seven different Rebels have played their first game in an Ole Miss uniform. Transfers Jaden Pone, Delaney Rummell and Ryan Starr have all found a spot in the starting lineup, while Brianna Lopez has made two appearances out of the bullpen. Freshman Alexa Rosales and Ma'Nia Womack also made their collegiate debuts on the weekend, with Womack recording her first career home run. After missing the entire 2023 season with an injury, redshirt freshman Grace Thompson stepped onto the field for the first time in her career.

LEGACY AND LOYALTY Playing in her fifth and final season of eligibility, Paige Smith elected to return to Ole Miss for legacy and loyalty. With unfinished business on her mind, Smith looks to leave her mark as one of the program's top sluggers. A true threat in the middle of the Rebel lineup, she is one of seven players in Ole Miss history with 100 hits and 100 RBI and ranks fourth in the record books with 32 home runs and 134 RBI. With over 200 career games under her belt, Smith brings a veteran presence to the team and looks to carry Ole Miss back on a deep postseason run.

For all Ole Miss softball news and information, go to OleMissSports.com and follow the Rebels on Twitter at @OleMissSoftball, on Facebook at Ole Miss Softball and on Instagram at @olemisssoftball. Also, follow head coach Jamie Trachsel on Twitter at @Jamie_Trachsel.

Kennesaw State engineering graduate has literally come a long way

Over her first two decades of life, Maria Gonzalez has dealt with some major changes, the most significant being a 1,400-mile move with her family from Central America to northwest Georgia, where she learned English and adapted to a new culture.And, on Dec. 14, the Kennesaw State University senior will proudly wear a cap and gown to be presented with the bachelor’s degree in civil engineering she earned from the Southern Polytechnic College of Engineerin...

Over her first two decades of life, Maria Gonzalez has dealt with some major changes, the most significant being a 1,400-mile move with her family from Central America to northwest Georgia, where she learned English and adapted to a new culture.

And, on Dec. 14, the Kennesaw State University senior will proudly wear a cap and gown to be presented with the bachelor’s degree in civil engineering she earned from the Southern Polytechnic College of Engineering and Engineering Technology.

Gonzalez said her parents are proud she will be the first one in her extended family to graduate from college. Plus, they are in awe of her journey from a 9-year-old little girl in a new country, to the woman she is today graduating from college with honors. She has a career in civil engineering waiting for her, taking a full-time position in a local engineering firm.

“It’s sometimes hard to comprehend all of that,” Gonzalez said. “Not a lot of us have this opportunity, but it’s a big accomplishment and I’m really happy and proud of where I am right now.”

Originally from Guatemala, Gonzalez and her family moved to the United States when she was in elementary school. But she not only had to adjust to life in Rome, Georgia, she had to spend nearly two years learning English. After graduating from high school in 2017, Gonzalez took a year off from schooling to figure out her next move.

“I needed to wait a year to figure out what I wanted to do,” Gonzalez said. “I realized I wanted to go to school. At the time, Georgia Highlands College was my best option and a path to transition to Kennesaw State.”

She realized early on that she loved math and knew she wanted to apply that passion into a career path.

“I know it may sound crazy, but numbers can be pretty abstract,” Gonzalez said. “For me though, for some reason, they make sense. So, I love that.”

Starting at Kennesaw State in 2021, a huge factor in her decision to pursue civil engineering was her dad, who Gonzalez said had wanted to be an engineer.

“Certain circumstances stopped him,” Gonzalez said. “I wanted to continue what he wanted to do, and I chose civil engineering. He was excited for me.”

In her time at Kennesaw State, Gonzalez has been heavily involved in the Society of Hispanic Engineers. As for being a female heading into a male dominated field, the quiet but fierce student said she is ready.

“One of the things I realized when I started in engineering was that I was often the only woman in the room,” Gonzalez said. “But I refused to let that stop me from succeeding. I just knew I would need to work a little harder and prove myself more.”

– By Amanda Cook

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A leader in innovative teaching and learning, Kennesaw State University offers undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees to its more than 45,000 students. Kennesaw State is a member of the University System of Georgia with 11 academic colleges. The university’s vibrant campus culture, diverse population, strong global ties and entrepreneurial spirit draw students from throughout the country and the world. Kennesaw State is a Carnegie-designated doctoral research institution (R2), placing it among an elite group of only 7 percent of U.S. colleges and universities with an R1 or R2 status. For more information, visit kennesaw.edu.

KSU Travels to Georgia Southern for In-State Battle

KENNESAW, GA - The Kennesaw State women's tennis team continues its season Friday, Feb. 2 at Georgia Southern. The Owls prepare for their second match of the year after competing at Louisville last Sunday.Match 2: Kennesaw State (0-1) vs. Georgia Southern (4-0) Date: Friday, February 2; 1:00 p.m. Location: Wallis Tennis Center | Statesboro, Ga Links: ...

KENNESAW, GA - The Kennesaw State women's tennis team continues its season Friday, Feb. 2 at Georgia Southern. The Owls prepare for their second match of the year after competing at Louisville last Sunday.

Match 2: Kennesaw State (0-1) vs. Georgia Southern (4-0) Date: Friday, February 2; 1:00 p.m. Location: Wallis Tennis Center | Statesboro, Ga Links: Roster | Schedule | Live Stats

Scouting Georgia Southern The Eagles went 19-6 overall and 8-3 in Sun Belt Conference play last season. The team is currently undefeated as they come off a 4-0 win against Elon.

Series History Friday's match will be the 11th between the two teams. The Eagles currently lead the series 7-3. The two teams last competed in 2020 with Georgia Southern earning a close victory, 4-3.

Last Time Out The Kennesaw State women's tennis team fell short in a tough competition against Louisville Sunday afternoon.

The Owls jumped out strong, taking the doubles point in a three-game sweep. Sophia Unger/Izabelle Persson had a dominating performance on court two, defeating Lillian Mould/Berta Miret (LOU) 6-1. Ema Baraniakova/Taylor Dean followed by claiming a 6-4 victory over Allie Gretkowski/Lika Peresypkina (LOU). Sofia Madrid/Laura Nadaska sealed the doubles point after defeating Ibifuro Clement/Jamilah Snells (LOU) 5-4 in a challenging battle.

Kennesaw State led 1-0 after doubles play. Louisville was able to come back and collect all single-match points, leading them to a victory.

NEXT UP: Alabama State hosts the Owls Friday, Feb. 9 at the Olean Black Underwood Tennis Center.

Social Media: Twitter | FacebookTo keep up with the latest Kennesaw State women's tennis news follow the team on Twitter @KSUOwlNation and @KSUOwlsWTenn, on Instagram @ksuwomenstennis or by liking Kennesaw State Owls on Facebook.

'Excited for life': 70-year-old woman graduates from Kennesaw State

KENNESAW, Ga. - A recent Kennesaw State University graduate is living proof that it's never too late to achieve your dreams.Gloria Stowers walked across the stage in her cap and gown at 70 years old.In a sea of caps and gowns, the art education major stands out, and it's not just because of the tiger stripes on her cap."My husband gave me this little figurine, and it was like a tiger. And he said, ‘If you want to go to college, go get ’em tiger,'" Stowers said.She's a little ...

KENNESAW, Ga. - A recent Kennesaw State University graduate is living proof that it's never too late to achieve your dreams.

Gloria Stowers walked across the stage in her cap and gown at 70 years old.

In a sea of caps and gowns, the art education major stands out, and it's not just because of the tiger stripes on her cap.

"My husband gave me this little figurine, and it was like a tiger. And he said, ‘If you want to go to college, go get ’em tiger,'" Stowers said.

She's a little older than the average college graduate.

"Yes, I'm 70. I'll be 71 in April," she said.

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Six and a half years ago, Stowers decided it was time to achieve her dream and went to college.

"I wanted to get away from the generation of my family being uneducated to being educated. Because being educated can give you opportunities in life. It makes the road that much easier. It gives you options you don't even know of until you go," Stowers said.

Gloria's parents had an elementary-level education. As a single mother, she helped her three children go to college.

"I think the background of my mom's story is so unique, just with her going from a wife with three kids and going from my dad dying and her being left with a 12-year-old, a 6-year-old, and a 3-year-old at that point in time and still not giving up," Gloria's daughter Maya said.

Gloria says her main priority was her children, Dijon, Sasha, and Maya. When they were all on their own two feet, it was her turn.

"I wouldn't say the key word is wait. I would say, no matter what, it is that you have a desire for, put the action into it. And time is of the essence, so every day utilize the time that is given to you. And that is my fulfillment of all the things that I've accomplished. Be blessed and take advantage of what's at hand," Stowers said.

SEE ALSO: MARTA'S LONGEST-SERVING BUS OPERATOR, COY DUMAS JR., HONORED AFTER 50 YEARS OF SERVICE

She says her teachers called her a model student, and her kids were not surprised.

"Mom at 70 had to learn statistics, and some people are like, 'Oh, I don't do math.' And mom is 70, and she's doing it," her son Dijon said.

"I think that a lot of people are actually afraid to try, and she doesn't have that," her daughter Sasha said.

Even though she's earned her degree in art education, Gloria says she's nowhere near done learning or growing.

"That's instilled in me today. I still got many more things I want to do. I'm so excited for life," she said.

Stowers said she knows she wants to teach children art, and she's open to whatever opportunity comes her way.

Accident spurs Kennesaw State student to research

In one moment, Heru Crooks’ life trajectory changed when he was seriously injured in a car crash in 2016.Crooks, who graduated from high school at age 16, had planned on taking a little time off, maybe a gap year or two to work and pursue some other passions, before going to college to study something in the sciences. But that all changed when the car he was riding in flipped over on Interstate 75 and the impact left him paralyzed from the navel down.Crooks, now a Kennesaw State University sophomore, says it was that unfo...

In one moment, Heru Crooks’ life trajectory changed when he was seriously injured in a car crash in 2016.

Crooks, who graduated from high school at age 16, had planned on taking a little time off, maybe a gap year or two to work and pursue some other passions, before going to college to study something in the sciences. But that all changed when the car he was riding in flipped over on Interstate 75 and the impact left him paralyzed from the navel down.

Crooks, now a Kennesaw State University sophomore, says it was that unfortunate turn of events that actually gave him the clarity to see his future as a scientist studying stem cell treatments — the same treatments that helped him recover sooner than his doctors expected after the accident.

“I want to know things, in this case why those treatments worked for me,” he said. “So I figure KSU is the best place for me to find out how they worked, and to discover even better treatments.”

Crooks said he underwent eight surgeries in the three days immediately after the accident, and then endured several months of intense physical therapy at Atlanta’s Shepherd Center, a world-renowned rehabilitation center. He was told that he was paralyzed and would spend the rest of his life using a wheelchair.

“I've always had an affinity toward science, life, the universe, but definitely my incident sparked supreme interest in the sciences,” he said. “Of course, from having this particular injury, my interest in the human nervous system and neurology just expanded greatly. Everything that could offer any idea about the human nervous system just sparked my interest.”

Crooks said his father was his biggest champion. Three months after the accident, the two went to Panama for one course of syncopal stem cell therapy, which incorporates stem cells from discarded umbilical cords as well as cells from the patient’s own bone marrow. Crooks said he regained some ability to control parts of his body, as well as lessened dependence on medication, through these therapies.

Later, they traveled to India for a more aggressive course of stem cell treatments, this one focused on regenerating nerves in the spinal cord. That helped Crooks get back on his feet. He said he walked a short distance with a walker and leg braces within two years of the accident, which impressed his team of doctors.

All the while, Crooks said he read anything and everything on the various treatments and therapies he experienced. Four years after the accident, he had a greater desire to learn, and decided it was time to go to college. He chose Kennesaw State for its proximity to his family in Tucker, Ga. and its affordability, but he soon discovered a campus with myriad opportunities for a curious future scientist.

Perhaps the most important opportunity was the one he found with professor of biology Martin Hudson, whose research focuses on nervous system formation and disorders. Crooks said his interest in biotechnology best reflected Hudson’s research into neurologic pathology.

“I want to be part of that new biotechnology wave and help cure myself and help cure others,” Crooks said. “The classes I took initially were good, but I wanted something more in-depth. Dr. Hudson's lab caught my eye because his research focused on neuroscience that took in science and genetics, which were my two favorite things, so it just seemed like a match.”

Hudson researches how the nervous system forms and the pathologies that take hold when the process goes awry, by studying a transparent microscopic worm called a nematode. He said bright, curious students join his laboratory group yearly, but few with the desire to research deep scientific topics on their own time as Crooks does.

“He’s got a story, but the most important thing to me is he wants to be a scientist, and I can help train him inclusively,” Hudson said. “Finding someone that is instantly engaged is uncommon, like he’s taking notes and filing things away before you even prompt him to do so—an innate curiosity. He’s been a major asset to our research team.”

Crooks will spend the summer doing research through the Undergraduate Research Training Initiative for Student Enhancement (U-RISE) program, funded through the National Institutes of Health and dedicated to uplifting undergraduate researchers from underserved communities interested in pursuing doctoral degrees in biomedical sciences. When he earns his bachelor’s in biochemistry in 2025, Crooks plans to do just that. He said he wants to be an asset to the scientific world at large.

“There is increasing potential in regenerative biomedical science, and I want to advance this field in a transformative way,” he said. “A crazy turn of events has turned into a blessing; my accident was a catalyst for my desire to learn and develop. I’m enthused and thankful that KSU is the place for me to explore my love for science.”

Photos by Matt Yung

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A leader in innovative teaching and learning, Kennesaw State University offers undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degrees to its more than 45,000 students. Kennesaw State is a member of the University System of Georgia with 11 academic colleges. The university’s vibrant campus culture, diverse population, strong global ties and entrepreneurial spirit draw students from throughout the country and the world. Kennesaw State is a Carnegie-designated doctoral research institution (R2), placing it among an elite group of only 7 percent of U.S. colleges and universities with an R1 or R2 status. For more information, visit kennesaw.edu.

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